The Broken Way

Ann Voskamp's style is hard for some people to take. Her books are prose poetry, and those who are interested in a strictly academic systematic theology will be disappointed. I find that her writing style is the most common criticism by people who don't like her books. I, however, love the way she writes. It's like an amalgam of T.S. Eliot and Bonhoeffer.

Another criticism I've heard of Voskamp is that her theology is heretical mysticism that perverts the gospel. I read one "discernment" blogger saying that she could hear the whispering of the serpent through Ann Voskamp's writing. I honestly don't get this one at all. I didn't find any trace of bad doctrine in this book at all. Maybe she emphasizes things in a different way than I would, maybe she uses non-standard theological vocabulary, but what she is presenting here is a pretty solid theology of suffering such as Martin Luther would have undoubtedly approved. She's also probably more well…

The Eternal Masculinity of God the Father

"Christian theology holds that God the Father is a Spirit (John 4:24), and one of the characteristics of spirits is hat they don't have biological anything, and this would mean (it would seem to follow) that they don't have biological sex... This means that His masculinity is not a function of Him being Male. God the Father is not male, but He is still ultimately masculine...This might seem like a trivial point, but actually a great deal rides upon it. The position that God is a biological male (as Zeus plainly was, contributing much to Hera's exasperation) is a view that theologians of another age would have called "a heresy." When we call Him Father, we are not saying (or implying) that He is male in any way. What we are saying is that He is ultimately masculine, and that every masculine office in the created order reflects that masculinity in some way, partaking in it somehow. The historic Christian position here is that God has taught us how to speak of Him because there was something we plainly needed to learn. We needed to learn it because we didn't know it yet."

Douglas Wilson, Father Hunger, p. 38

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