The Epistles of St. Peter and St. Jude Preached and Explained

Many people have a skewed view of Martin Luther because they've only been exposed to his polemic writings. However, if you really want to know Luther's heart, you need to read some of his sermons, letters, and commentaries. In the latter category, his commentary on Galatians is the most famous, but this set of commentaries on the epistles of Peter and Jude may be an even better place to start. Luther's pastoral concern shines through every page.

Outside of its historical significance, it holds up as a good commentary in its own right. Luther clearly and practically expounds the message of these epistles with excellent application to the Christian life.

The Eternal Masculinity of God the Father

"Christian theology holds that God the Father is a Spirit (John 4:24), and one of the characteristics of spirits is hat they don't have biological anything, and this would mean (it would seem to follow) that they don't have biological sex... This means that His masculinity is not a function of Him being Male. God the Father is not male, but He is still ultimately masculine...This might seem like a trivial point, but actually a great deal rides upon it. The position that God is a biological male (as Zeus plainly was, contributing much to Hera's exasperation) is a view that theologians of another age would have called "a heresy." When we call Him Father, we are not saying (or implying) that He is male in any way. What we are saying is that He is ultimately masculine, and that every masculine office in the created order reflects that masculinity in some way, partaking in it somehow. The historic Christian position here is that God has taught us how to speak of Him because there was something we plainly needed to learn. We needed to learn it because we didn't know it yet."

Douglas Wilson, Father Hunger, p. 38

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