Thisby Thestoop and the Black Mountain

It’s fair to say that I read a good number of books children’s books. Having kids of my own, I like to pilfer their shelves from time to time. In our house, we like to stock “the classics” as a sort of quality guarantee. Since children’s books became a genre there have been writers who have tried to cash in on the children’s market as a way to make a quick buck with little effort. Reading “the classics” means that you get the best books from every era without having to wade through the formulaic twaddle, most of which has mercifully been forgotten over the years.
It’s a different story with modern children’s books. Picking up a new children’s book means taking a chance on wasting your time, and the modern children’s book publishing machine loves tried and true formulas. After the success of Harry Potter we got books about schools for magical/mythological/specially talented kids who are sorted into groups based on their personalities. After The Hunger Games took off, we’ve have had m…

The Ninety-Five Theses

On this day in history, in the year 1517, Martin Luther published his 95 theses in Wittenberg. George Grant has a great post about the 95 Theses over at his blog that gives a good historical background to the theses. So go over there and read it for the history.


I simply wanted to make a few comments about the theses themselves. When you read Martin Luther's theses on indulgences, you might be disappointed. The idea that such an innocuous set of discussion points written for a group of theologians by a man who clearly honored the pope and the Church could spark the Reformation is almost unbelievable. The fact that the 95 Theses produced any controversy at all is a clear indication of the sorry state of the Church at the time (if the scads of satires and criticisms floating around already at the time weren't enough).


If you've never taken the time to read the 95 Theses yourself, pop on over to this website and read them through today. Also go watch the movie with Joseph Fiennes. Because despite its Hollywoodish historical liberties, it's still a fun movie.

Luther's mad lute-playing and nun-wooing skills are actually historically spot on, though.

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