The Broken Way

Ann Voskamp's style is hard for some people to take. Her books are prose poetry, and those who are interested in a strictly academic systematic theology will be disappointed. I find that her writing style is the most common criticism by people who don't like her books. I, however, love the way she writes. It's like an amalgam of T.S. Eliot and Bonhoeffer.

Another criticism I've heard of Voskamp is that her theology is heretical mysticism that perverts the gospel. I read one "discernment" blogger saying that she could hear the whispering of the serpent through Ann Voskamp's writing. I honestly don't get this one at all. I didn't find any trace of bad doctrine in this book at all. Maybe she emphasizes things in a different way than I would, maybe she uses non-standard theological vocabulary, but what she is presenting here is a pretty solid theology of suffering such as Martin Luther would have undoubtedly approved. She's also probably more well…

The Ninety-Five Theses

On this day in history, in the year 1517, Martin Luther published his 95 theses in Wittenberg. George Grant has a great post about the 95 Theses over at his blog that gives a good historical background to the theses. So go over there and read it for the history.


I simply wanted to make a few comments about the theses themselves. When you read Martin Luther's theses on indulgences, you might be disappointed. The idea that such an innocuous set of discussion points written for a group of theologians by a man who clearly honored the pope and the Church could spark the Reformation is almost unbelievable. The fact that the 95 Theses produced any controversy at all is a clear indication of the sorry state of the Church at the time (if the scads of satires and criticisms floating around already at the time weren't enough).


If you've never taken the time to read the 95 Theses yourself, pop on over to this website and read them through today. Also go watch the movie with Joseph Fiennes. Because despite its Hollywoodish historical liberties, it's still a fun movie.

Luther's mad lute-playing and nun-wooing skills are actually historically spot on, though.

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