The Epistles of St. Peter and St. Jude Preached and Explained

Many people have a skewed view of Martin Luther because they've only been exposed to his polemic writings. However, if you really want to know Luther's heart, you need to read some of his sermons, letters, and commentaries. In the latter category, his commentary on Galatians is the most famous, but this set of commentaries on the epistles of Peter and Jude may be an even better place to start. Luther's pastoral concern shines through every page.

Outside of its historical significance, it holds up as a good commentary in its own right. Luther clearly and practically expounds the message of these epistles with excellent application to the Christian life.

Watch out for those Turkeys!

In his Dictionary of Cuisine, Alexandre Dumas gives the reader a cautionary tale about turkeys involving the celebrated French poet Boileau.

"Boileau, when a child, was playing in a courtyard where, among other poultry, there happened to be a turkey. Suddenly the child fell, his dress went up, and the turkey...flew at him and with his beak so wounded poor Nicolas that, forever barred from becoming an erotic poet, he became a satiric one and maligned women, instead."

Ouch! So watch out for those turkeys, folks. They're more dangerous than they look. Dumas goes on to add:

"From this, no doubt, stemmed the aversion he had for the Jesuits, sharing the popular belief that they had introduced turkeys to France."
So you wanna mess with the Jesuits do you?

Source:
Alexandre Dumas' Dictionary of Cuisine  (page 250)

Comments