The Broken Way

Ann Voskamp's style is hard for some people to take. Her books are prose poetry, and those who are interested in a strictly academic systematic theology will be disappointed. I find that her writing style is the most common criticism by people who don't like her books. I, however, love the way she writes. It's like an amalgam of T.S. Eliot and Bonhoeffer.

Another criticism I've heard of Voskamp is that her theology is heretical mysticism that perverts the gospel. I read one "discernment" blogger saying that she could hear the whispering of the serpent through Ann Voskamp's writing. I honestly don't get this one at all. I didn't find any trace of bad doctrine in this book at all. Maybe she emphasizes things in a different way than I would, maybe she uses non-standard theological vocabulary, but what she is presenting here is a pretty solid theology of suffering such as Martin Luther would have undoubtedly approved. She's also probably more well…

Hobby Lobby

I was going to make a long post about the ridiculous backlash about Hobby Lobby in the wake of the Supreme Court decision, but, thankfully, Liberty.me has it covered, and thus I save some time.

No, Hobby Lobby is Not Violating Your Rights by Britney Logan

For the record, the company I work for pays me on a 1099. That means that I am officially a contract worker; by a free transaction, I sign a contract with the company to do x, y and z for them, and they agree to pay me x, y and z for my services. Which is, you know, how all employment should work anyway. That contract does not include health care, so I buy my own health insurance. Is the company somehow stealing my freedom to have health insurance? Not at all. I'm still totally free to have health insurance. In fact, I do have health insurance. That I buy. With the money I've earned. Because that's how you get things in a free market.

Likewise, if Hobby Lobby says, "We don't agree with these 4 forms of birth control and don't want to buy them for you," does that mean that they are denying their female employees any freedom? No. Those employees can go out and buy those forms of birth control. With money. Because, once again, that's how you get things you want...you earn money and then buy them. But of course, I'm just one of those crazy people that think the government shouldn't be passing laws that regulate the free agreements made between employees and employers to begin with, so what do I know?

Well, I said this wasn't going to turn into a long blog post, so before I make myself a liar, you'd better just click on the link above and read the article.

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